Photo of Aydin H. Harston

Aydin Harston combines his love for science and technology with legal expertise to advocate for his clients in all matters necessary to grow, protect, and defend their businesses.  With a Ph.D. in biochemistry and numerous scientific and legal publications, Aydin seeks to produce creative and effective  approaches to achieve his clients' goals as efficiently as possible.

Updated November 15, 2021

  • FDA and EMA both approve first biosimilar version of Lucentis® (ranbizumab).
  • FDA has approved only two biosimilars in 2021 after only approving three in 2020.
  • EMA approves four more Avastin® (bevacizumab) biosimilars, bringing the total number of approved bevacizumab approvals to nine, but also withdraws approval of two of bevacizumab and

On October 15, 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) approved Boehringer Ingelheim’s Cyltezo® (adalimumab-adbm), the first interchangeable biosimilar to AbbVie’s blockbuster immunosuppressant Humira® (adalimumab).  We previously discussed Boehringer Ingelheim’s Citizen Petition requesting a change in the FDA’s interpretation of “strength” of biological products under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (“BPCIA”).  The

Updated March 8, 2021

  • FDA has not approved any biosimilars in 2021 after only approving three in 2020.
  • EMA approves second Novolog® (insulin aspartate), fifth Avastin® (bevacizumab), eighth Neulasta® (pegfilgrastim), and twelfth Humira® (adalimumab) biosimilars, and withdraws approval of an adalimumab biosimilar and a pegfilgrastim biosimilar.
  • Given the increasing number of approved biosimilars in Europe,

Updated October 12, 2020

  • FDA has only approved two biosimilars in 2020.
  • No biosimilars have launched in the U.S. since April 2020.
  • EMA approves first Novolog® (insulin aspartate), third and fourth Avastin® (bevacizumab), and sixth Herceptin® (trastuzumab) biosimilars.

As pharmaceutical drug costs attract increasing media attention and political scrutiny, a growing number of biosimilar drugs

  • FDA has not approved any biosimilars in 2020.
  • Two Herceptin® (trastuzumab) biosimilars launch in the U.S. in Q1 2020.
  • EMA approves third Enbrel® (etanercept), eleventh Humira® (adalimumab), seventh Rituxan® (rituximab), and second Humalog® (insulin lispro) biosimilars.
  • FDA has redefined “Biologic Products” to open new pathways for biosimilar and interchangeable approvals of proteins including insulin.

As

  • Since November 2019, biosimilar versions of pegfilgrastim, rituximab, bevacizumab, and trastuzumab have launched in the United States.
  • FDA approved fifth Humira® (adalimumab) biosimilar, but it will not launch until 2023.
  • FDA approved third Neulasta® (pegfilgrastim) biosimilar and all three have launched.
  • FDA approved fourth Remicade® (infliximab) biosimilar.

As pharmaceutical drug costs attract increasing media attention

  • FDA approves fourth Humira® (adalimumab) biosimilar with launch delayed to 2023.
  • FDA approves second Rituxan® (rituximab) biosimilar, neither of which has launched.
  • FDA approves second Avastin® (bevacizumab) biosimilar, which is expected to launch in late 2019.
  • FDA approves fifth Herceptin® (trastuzumab) biosimilar, which launched in July 2019.
  • European Medicines Agency has not approved any new

Canada implemented its patent term extension program, the Certificate of Supplementary Protection (CSP) framework, on September 21, 2017.  The CSP regime is beneficial to qualifying pharmaceutical product developers because it can add up to two additional years of patent protection.  Notably, CSP is not as beneficial as other major jurisdictions, which generally allow up to