The recently enacted “Purple Book Continuity Act of 2019” went into effect as of June 25, 2021.  The FDA must proactively update the Purple Book information every 30 days with an alphabetical list of licensed biologics, including the date of marketing application approval and the marketing/licensure status.  Additionally, there is now a potentially higher price

Updated March 8, 2021

  • FDA has not approved any biosimilars in 2021 after only approving three in 2020.
  • EMA approves second Novolog® (insulin aspartate), fifth Avastin® (bevacizumab), eighth Neulasta® (pegfilgrastim), and twelfth Humira® (adalimumab) biosimilars, and withdraws approval of an adalimumab biosimilar and a pegfilgrastim biosimilar.
  • Given the increasing number of approved biosimilars in Europe,

On December 2, 2020, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Boehringer Ingelheim”) submitted a Citizen Petition requesting a change in the FDA’s interpretation of “strength” of biological products under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (“BPCIA”).  The Citizen Petition is available on regulations.gov under docket number: FDA-2020-P-2247.  Boehringer Ingelheim seeks an interpretation of “strength” to

In Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC v. Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc., No. 2019-2402 (Fed. Cir. Nov. 5, 2020), the Federal Circuit clarified the venue analysis of 28 U.S.C. § 1400(b), which controls venue for patent infringement cases.  Section 1400(b) provides that an action for patent infringement may be brought in the judicial district where the

Updated October 12, 2020

  • FDA has only approved two biosimilars in 2020.
  • No biosimilars have launched in the U.S. since April 2020.
  • EMA approves first Novolog® (insulin aspartate), third and fourth Avastin® (bevacizumab), and sixth Herceptin® (trastuzumab) biosimilars.

As pharmaceutical drug costs attract increasing media attention and political scrutiny, a growing number of biosimilar drugs

We have previously covered various aspects of a legal battle between Genentech and Amgen regarding Amgen’s efforts to market Mvasi, a biosimilar to Genentech’s bevacizumab product, Avastin.  These aspects include Genentech’s quickly-dismissed February 2017 action contending Amgen was in violation of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (“BPCIA”) (covered here and here), and

  • FDA has not approved any biosimilars in 2020.
  • Two Herceptin® (trastuzumab) biosimilars launch in the U.S. in Q1 2020.
  • EMA approves third Enbrel® (etanercept), eleventh Humira® (adalimumab), seventh Rituxan® (rituximab), and second Humalog® (insulin lispro) biosimilars.
  • FDA has redefined “Biologic Products” to open new pathways for biosimilar and interchangeable approvals of proteins including insulin.

As

In February, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) published a joint statement regarding collaborative efforts to promote competition in the marketplace for biological products – including biosimilars and interchangeable products – by identifying joint goals both agencies will work to achieve, as well as measures to be taken

On January 15, 2020, Hospira filed a petition for rehearing en banc asking the full Federal Circuit to reconsider a prior panel’s analysis of the Safe Harbor provision and reverse the finding of infringement. In December 2019, the Federal Circuit affirmed the District of Delaware’s decision denying Hospira’s motion for judgment as a matter of

  • Since November 2019, biosimilar versions of pegfilgrastim, rituximab, bevacizumab, and trastuzumab have launched in the United States.
  • FDA approved fifth Humira® (adalimumab) biosimilar, but it will not launch until 2023.
  • FDA approved third Neulasta® (pegfilgrastim) biosimilar and all three have launched.
  • FDA approved fourth Remicade® (infliximab) biosimilar.

As pharmaceutical drug costs attract increasing media attention