Over four years ago, in October 2014, Amgen initiated a patent infringement suit against Sanofi and Regeneron regarding biologics for treatment of high cholesterol.[1]  The case reached an important milestone recently as a jury entered a verdict largely upholding the validity of Amgen’s asserted patents, to the disappointment of Sanofi and Regeneron.  A similar

The PTAB recently instituted a second IPR of US Patent 9,296,821 (“the ’821 patent”), which covers certain uses of Rituxan® (rituximab), a monoclonal antibody marketed by Genentech and Biogen Pharmaceuticals.  The ‘821 patent claims methods of treating low grade or follicular non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) by administering rituximab during a chemotherapeutic regimen of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and

Since our prior article on the litigation between Amgen and Hospira over Hospira’s proposed biosimilar to Amgen’s Epogen®, there have been several developments, including those that occurred after the Supreme Court’s recent Amgen v. Sandoz decision.

The last major development we previously discussed was a motion for a preliminary injunction filed by Amgen seeking “to

The patent venue statue, 28 U.S.C. § 1400(b), states that “[a]ny civil action for patent infringement may be brought in the judicial district where the defendant resides or where the defendant has committed acts of infringement and has a regular and established place of business.” See 28 U.S.C. § 1400(b).  Recently, in TC Heartland LLC

Introduction

The Amgen, Inc. and Amgen Manufacturing, Limited (“Amgen”) litigation against Hospira, Inc. (“Hospira”), filed in September 2015, was one of the earliest cases filed under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (“BPCIA”).  The case involves Hospira’s proposed biosimilar to Amgen’s Epogen®/Procrit® (epoetin alfa).  The procedural posture is somewhat complicated, as

Partner Nikki Gifford gave a presentation entitled “Intellectual Property – Recent Developments and Implications,” at the World Biosimilar Congress in San Diego, California, on Wednesday, May 24, 2017. The 30-minute session covered: (1) the BPCIA’s “patent dance”; (2) what’s at stake in Sandoz v. Amgen, and the potential outcomes and practical implications of the

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Wednesday in its first biosimilar case.  On a petition filed in Sandoz, Inc. v. Amgen, Inc., et al. No. Case No. 2015-1039, and a cross-petition filed in Amgen Inc., et al. v. Sandoz, Inc., Case No. 2015-1195, the Court was asked to interpret two provisions of